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Topic: The Bilgamesh Epic

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The Bilgamesh Epic

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Bilgamesh.jpg

Turns out that the original name for the Gilgamesh Epic (Cain's account of the death of Abel and the second battle for the Tree of Life) is actually Bilgamesh.

Not surprisingly, for those who believe me that Cain is the Antichrist and that the Land of Gog and Magog is Turkey, it turns out that the word Bilgamesh does, in fact, originate in Turkey.

Although the name Bilgamesh is not known as Turkish, the amazing thing is that both of these names  (Bilgamesh and Gilgamesh) are Turkish and are from Turkish. In the epic story, the identities of the characters have been described in a way that explain the meaning of the character names in Turkish. For that reason I will give some background information from the epic story of Bilgamesh itself and also from other sources. But before that, let us learn about the word Bilgemish  in Turkish.

The Turkish verb "Bilmek", meaning "to know", is the root word for the Turkish word Bilgemish. The stem of this word is "Bil" meaning "know".  The modern Turkish term "Bilgemish" means "one who has become learned", "one who has become full of knowledge", "one who has become wise and acquired wisdom". Thus, "Bilgemish" is an adjective that can be used to describe a learned, knowledgable and wise person. The hero of the Sumerian epic story "Bilgamesh" or its altered version of "Gilgamesh" was [described as] such a person, thus making the Turkish "Bilgemish" as old as the Sumerian "Bilgamesh" - and even earlier. In order to utilize a word such as "Bilgamesh" in an epic story, that word and the concept that it represents must have been known far earlier than the time that it was used in the epic story. 

The story of Bilgamesh must have been composed and written at least 6,000 years ago.

Thus, we see in the Prologue of the epic story of Bilgamesh :

"O Bilgamesh, lord of Kullab, great is thy praise. This was the man to whom all things were known; this was the king who knew the countries of the world. He was wise, he saw mysteries and knew secret things, he brought us a tale of the days before the flood. He went on a long journey, was weary, worn-out with labor, and returning engraved on a stone the whole story."

 

https://www.polatkaya.net/Bilgamesh.html



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Is Turkish the Tongue of the Fallen Angels?

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