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Topic: Tongue of Angels?

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Tongue of Angels?

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So, I just found out that the Gilgamesh Epic was originally written in Turkish and originally titled the Bilgamesh Epic (meaning the Man of Knowledge).

Problem is, that predates the confusion of the tongues at Babylon and the Flood as well.

So, is Turkish a Mystery Language?

The Tongue of the (fallen) Angels?

When it comes, however, to a singularly indecipherable text, the Voynich Manuscript, the language it contains encodes the wisdom of a solitary intelligence, or an obscure, hermitic community that seems to have left no other trace behind.

Father Ahmet Ardiç, an electrical engineer by trade and scholar of Turkish language by passionate calling, claims the Voynich script is a kind of Old Turkic, “written in a ‘poetic’ style,” notes Nick Pelling at the site Cipher Mysteries, “that often displays ‘phonemic orthography,’” meaning the author spelled out words the way he, or she, heard them.

Ahmet noticed that the words often began with the same characters, then had different endings, a pattern that corresponds with the linguistic structure of Turkish. Furthermore, Ozan Ardiç informs us, the language of the Voynich has a “rhythmic structure,” a formal, poetic regularity.

Prominent Medieval scholar Lisa Fagin Davis, head of the Medieval Academy of America—who has herself cast doubt on another recent translation attempt—calls the Ardiçs’ work “one of the few solutions I’ve seen that is consistent, is repeatable, and results in sensical text.”

http://www.openculture.com/2019/02/has-the-voynich-manuscript-finally-been-decoded.html

 



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Sun-Language Theory

The Sun Language Theory (Turkish: Güneş Dil Teorisi) was a Turkish nationalist linguistic hypothesis developed in Turkey in the 1930s that proposed that all human languages are descendants of one proto-Turkic primal language. The theory proposed that because this primal language had close phonemic resemblances to Turkish, all other languages can essentially be traced back to Turkic roots. According to the theory, the Central Asian worshippers, who wanted to salute the omnipotence of the sun and its life-giving qualities, had done so by transforming their meaningless blabbering into a coherent set of ritual utterings, and language was born, hence the name.

Influences on the theory included the ideas of the French historian Hilaire de Barenton, expressed in "L'Origine des Langues, des Religions et des Peuples", that all languages originated from hieroglyphs and cuneiform used by Sumerians and a paper of the Austrian linguist Hermann F. Kvergić of Vienna entitled "La psychologie de quelques éléments des langues Turques" ("The Psychology of Some Elements of the Turkic Languages").

As described in a 1936 New York Times article on the curriculum of the newly opened School of Language, History and Geography of Ankara University, the theory, "claims that the Sumerians, being Turks, originating in Central Asia, all languages also consequently originated there and first used by the Turks."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Language_Theory



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The Turkish Apaches mysteries

Based on the work of European linguists like Georges Dumézil on the Quechua, ‘Turkic Origins’ proponents point to similarities between some Turkish and Native American words, including ‘ata’ (father) and ‘ana’ (mother). The ancient Turks and Native Americans also share common spiritual practices: shamanism and the cult of the sun. Some authors also see parallels in myth and culture, including common motifs in carpets or similar kinds of music. DNA tests would serve to strengthen the hypothesis that Native Americans have Turkic origins, but so far it hasn’t gained widespread acceptance among researchers.

www.mashallahnews.com/the-turkish-apaches-mysteries-part-2/



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Gobekli Tepe: The World’s First Temple?

Six miles from Urfa, an ancient city in southeastern Turkey, Klaus Schmidt has made one of the most startling archaeological discoveries of our time: massive carved stones crafted and arranged by prehistoric people who had not yet developed metal tools or even pottery. The megaliths predate Stonehenge. The place is called Gobekli Tepe, and Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it's the site of the world's oldest temple.

Prehistoric people would have gazed upon herds of gazelle and other wild animals; gently flowing rivers, which attracted migrating geese and ducks; fruit and nut trees; and rippling fields of wild barley and wild wheat varieties such as emmer and einkorn. "This area was like a paradise," says Schmidt, a member of the German Archaeological Institute. Indeed, Gobekli Tepe sits at the northern edge of the Fertile Crescent—an arc of mild climate and arable land from the Persian Gulf to present-day Lebanon, Israel, Jordan and Egypt—and would have attracted hunter-gatherers from Africa and the Levant. And partly because Schmidt has found no evidence that people permanently resided on the summit of Gobekli Tepe itself, he believes this was a place of worship on an unprecedented scale—humanity's first "cathedral on a hill."

www.smithsonianmag.com/history/gobekli-tepe-the-worlds-first-temple-83613665/



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